The rules for failing and passing the new MOT 2018

The rules for failing and passing the new MOT 2018
The new rules will categorise defects as either: dangerous, major or minor. On the old MOT your vehicle got a pass, a pass with some advisory faults, or a fail.


There are also going to be new look MOT test result certificates.


MOT fails
Dangerous – Your vehicle fails if it has a dangerous fault. The vehicle cannot be driven until the fault has been repaired.
Major – Your vehicle fails if it has a major fault. The repair needs to be made as soon as possible.


MOT passes
Pass – Your vehicle passes and meets the legal standard.


Advisory – Your vehicle passes but there is an issue that you’ll need to keep an eye on, and repair if it gets worse.


Minor – Your vehicles passes but has an issue that needs to be corrected as soon as possible. If you don’t get it fixed it could get much worse.


In short, with a dangerous fault you cannot drive your car.


With a major fault, you might be able to drive your car if it is still roadworthy.


Remember: You can have your MOT carried out up to a month before your old MOT is due to run out, and the anniversary date will still be one year after the old certificate date – effectively meaning the MOT certificate will last for 13 months.


If your vehicle fails its MOT before your old MOT certificate expires:
• You can’t drive it with dangerous faults. These need to be repaired first. If you use a vehicle with a dangerous fault you can be fined £2,500, be banned from driving and get three points on your licence. This is because your vehicle is automatically recorded as no longer road legal on the UK’s digital vehicle database, so the authorities will know about its condition.


• You can drive your vehicle with a major fault if your old MOT is still valid, because you took your vehicle in for an MOT early. But your vehicle does have faults that may make it unroadworthy, and if stopped by the police you could be prosecuted.


If your vehicle fails the MOT on the same day as your MOT certificate expires:


• You may take your vehicle to get it repaired after is has failed its MOT test but you cannot use a vehicle with dangerous faults, or you can be fined £2,500, be banned from driving and get three penalty points. If it has major faults you can drive it to get repairs, but if the police stop and deem it unroadworthy you could be prosecuted.


• You can drive your vehicle to a test station for an MOT test booked in advance, although you would have needed to have any faults repaired so that it is roadworthy – and of course, without repairs, it is unlikely to pass an MOT. Again, dangerous faults uncorrected make it illegal to use on the road and you could get a fine and a driving ban.